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Having hard time from telling good eggs from bad? Here’s how.

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Do you have a hard time to know if the egg is good or bad? It may sound ridiculous to you. But it matters a lot to determine if it is already past its best before date.

Unfortunately, eggs don’t have label when it is best before or have stayed in the fridge for days. Smell alone does not guarantee if the egg is good or bad.

Here are some ways to know the difference.

Floating test

The most reliable way to determine the quality of an egg is the floating test.

Get a glass or small water container and fill it with water at room temperature. Then place the egg in the water. If it floats, the egg is way past its due date.

Why?

Generally, good eggs do not float. It sinks in the water because a rotten egg starts to decompose inside and weighs lighter as it gives off gases in the process. That while the decomposing egg’s mass remains the same, its weight becomes lighter.

Shake test

Shake it. Although this test is less reliable, it gives you a hint whether an egg is rotten or not.

Lift the egg. Shake it gently near your ear and listen. If you don’t hear or feel a sloshing sound, most likely the egg is fresh.

But don’t shake it hard.  Even a good egg would make a sloshing sound if you shake it hard. The key is shake it gently.

Smell test

Crack the egg. If it smells bad, you’ve got obviously a rotten egg.

Rottenness usually gives off bad smell because of its chemical composition. The key component of an egg is hydrogen sulfide. Once the egg becomes bad, it gives off the sulphur-like smell, which is a sign of decomposition.

Visual test

If the egg has a discoloured yolk, it’s bad. In some instances, the cloudy white part of the egg also signifies decomposition.

These changes in appearance of the yolk are not only because of decomposition and bacteria. It has something to do with its chemistry.

Eggs contain carbonic acid, an acid formed from the reaction of carbon dioxide and water. A decomposing egg slowly converts this acid into carbon dioxide again, making the egg lighter. That’s why the floating test is reliable.

As more carbonic acid turns into CO2 and other gases, the egg yolk’s appearance also changes. It will also make its smell different.

After performing a test, if you are still not sure, then don’t eat it. Stay always on the safe side than be sorry. (Robert Greene)

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