December 8, 2022

The crocodile trapped in a traditional“bubuh.” (Contributed photo)

A farmer out to trap freshwater fishes with a contraption made of indigenous materials caught a six-foot crocodile that scared him to the core on Sunday, June 5.
0 0
Trinity Audio
Read Time:1 Minute, 7 Second

Cotabato City, Philippines

A farmer out to trap freshwater fishes with a contraption made of indigenous materials caught a six-foot crocodile that scared him to the core on Sunday, June 5.

Epi Lamping said Monday he was stunned to see a crocodile inside the traditional “bubuh” that he left at one spot in the Pulangi River in Barangay Arakan in Carmen, North Cotabato several hours before.

He got nervous, retreated first and returned to check again the crocodile inside the bamboo cage rigged at a shallow part of the Pulangi River in Barangay Arakan.

Lamping told reporters the crocodile died three hours after he found it in his bubuh, supposedly intended only for tilapia and other freshwater fishes.

Get The News Right In Your Inbox …

The local government unit of Carmen on Monday urged residents of Barangy Arakan to take precautions when they go out and lay their fish traps in the rivers crisscrossing their villages.

The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) considered the Philippine crocodile as critically endangered animal.

This endemic freshwater crocodile, once thought to be extinct that inhabits the creeks and rivers, is the most threatened crocodile species in the world.   (John Unson with John Mahusay)

Want to express yourself? Write your thoughts in the Comment Box below.

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %